Featured Scooters

Our ‘Featured Scooters’ page is dedicated to the enthusiasm and hard work of our club members. We would like to share with you some examples of the type of scooter that our club members own and ride.

 

 

Paul Cleary from Ontario Canada has sent in some interesting photo’s of his recent Lambretta SX150 restoration/rebuild.

My scooter is a 1966 lambretta SX150..It came into Ontario back 2011 by a young women called Nicole who had ridden the scooter as her main mode of transport for 4 years in Vancouver.  After a couple of years sat in her garage in Toronto not being used,  she sold it to a friend who she thought would appreciate it.
He kept it up until 2016 when he traded it in at Mattereta.  When I bought it it was I would call a 10 footer, so decide to totally restore it.
Not realising that once you go down that rabbit trap…$$$$$   So one year later back in July 2017, I finally had it mostly complete. While I had the engine out, I did a casa 185 kit install and a new crank etc.

When I bought the scooter, it was certainly a road worthy and good looking scooter. My concern was were was it from?? Could I risk riding an unknown entity?  The Sx150 was never sold in Canada and only sold to the USA New York Police department.  I was concerned was it from Vietnam? It was only by going back to bare metal and tearing the engine apart that would make things right.

 

The whole scooter frame and parts went to a paint shop called Painters Edge.. They sand blasted the parts and powder coated everything.  As this left imperfections that the powder coat would not finish, I had to then rub down all the parts, prep and undercoat. Once I had finished the parts went to Jensens Custom Paint Shop in Whitby for the white finish and a clear coat.  The job cost twice as much this way, But has a great thick coat on it!

 

 

A special thanks to Paul for sharing this interesting account of his recent SX150 rebuild. Something a little bit different, being sent in all the way from Canada!     Maybe we’ll see him down at the Cambridge one night!

 

 

 

 

Sean Creighton from Monaghan Ireland has kindly sent in some recent photos and information about his ‘ongoing’  Vespa Cafe Racer project.

Sean’s Cafe racer project is based upon a 1958 Vespa VNA2T. Sean started the project a couple of years ago, but it keeps getting put on the back burner due to his other commitments. The scooter is all home done – home made screen from old helmet!  Honda CB175 tank with cut down PX toolbox door fitted and spare wheel tunnel. One unusual aspect, is the innovative rear hinged seat with damping pistons. Everything bolts off, so frame is unchanged apart from PX choke and a ignition key fitted.

Sean will keep us updated with any further progress on his Cafe racer – so watch this space!

 

 

 

 

MotoVespa 150s Mk2  – a potted history of the scooter and it’s rebuild

by Roger Sudlow.

I hope you find this brief history of the scooter interesting – I do know it was from the Mercia region of Spain and from ’66 was a postal scooter.  I’ve had both the major marques over the years – my last Lambretta was an S2 which went over to the Isle of Wight – funnily enough it’s just been on e-bay though I didn’t buy it back – yet….!!

I bought privately through Niall at Retrospective Scooters – although it ran well and looked solid enough, I knew that a rebuild was imminent. The back rack pulling out a 2″ lump of metal by the brake light was the green light I needed to progress as I was quite enjoying the original Spanish look and P200 engine.

On stripping and blasting, it became evident that I had a ‘2 stroke colander’ on my hands! so a complete cut out at the back and new Rally floor was required.

Phil at Dreamland did the body work – I had printed a Vespa GS picture and had set that as my target, sourcing the original Biacca Grigio paint code and getting it specially mixed.

Although not Spanish purist nor a GS, it’s mine, to my taste and lovingly hand built – I have certainly had many admirers – and a few about the scooter!

Anyway, the re-build was planned task by task within set time scales so I’d not spend too many hours and start making costly mistakes. I spent time discussing it through both with Niall and Buzz (Anthony) who were an invaluable help. There were some challenges along the way however the loom and cables weren’t quite as bad as I’d envisaged – very probably a 100% clean, a freshly painted scooter helps!

As ever, the maiden voyage was short and sweet with tightening of cables and a new carburettor – laying up over the winter had probably caused unseen damp. I have just bought a modest rack which is very much in keeping with the whole finish, I’m just awaiting an extended 7mm seat pin and it’ll be going on. I get married shortly (2nd and last time!) and the scooter will be in the hotel with a ‘just married’ leg shield banner and weather permitting, will be in may photos. If I get cold feet, it may also be my get away vehicle!

 

Roger’s nicely finished MotoVespa 150s

Many thanks to Roger for sending in this interesting account of his recent rebuild project and the very best of wishes for your forthcoming wedding! from all at LSC.

 

 

 

 

Blood, sweat and tears! – Gary Winch.

Lambretta Series 2 Restore and Custom Build. 2014-2017

Started off as a rough and ready, but complete 1960 Li 150 Series 2, Italian with NOVA registration
number and LCGB dating letter, purchased winter 2014. Legshields and mudguard rusted out, but
frame solid.

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile the engine was stripped down, seized and very old 150. Cases sent of to Oiltek for
conversion to 200 stud spacing in preparation for the TS1 kit. Second hand damaged TS1 barrel

sourced and sent off for barrel sleeve, to match Wossner 72mm piston, piston was ceramic
coated, sides, inner crown and crown of piston by the guys at Camcoat.
AF Mammoth head ordered and machined for use with 60 x 110 mm Harry Barlow Pro Porting
crank and no head packer/gasket.

Case back fro Oiltek, time for rebuild, AF Mammoth doweled and fitted, Casa chain tensioner and
LTH clutch. 17 46 sprockets on Li 150 gearbox. Pressure tested and passed.

Frame and bodywork back, BUT wasn’t exactly what was specced so a LOT more work went into
it by the guy commissioned for paint, including more welding and fabrication and a proper dry
build unlike the ‘attempt’ I had paid for. Lesson learned and I’ll only ever complete my own dry
builds from now on.

House of Kolor Brandy Wine Candy over silver base.

Rebuild commenced, PM Tuning stainless Forks , outboard shocks with double disc brake.

Cables and wiring going in, Oiltek long range tank fitted, they are a work of art and probably the
only thing I’ve bought that fits straight in no messing and no dremel time…

Headset on and masking tape to protect paint.

Fit something, remove it, refit, remove, adjust, fettle and so on and on. Seemed never ending at
times.

Koso Speedo with conversion ring by MB, not an easy fit but looks good.
Gamma Tech RTSE1000 unit, Cylinder Head & Exhaust Temp, plus speedo, Revs, fuel
countdown. Odometer, top kit and all readouts, values can be tailored to suit your setup.
Underneath is a Koso voltmeter to keep an eye on the charging system/battery.

Finally ready for MOT

 

 

Lambretta LI150 special replica, restore and build.

by Geoff Bell

About 15 years ago I went to a parts fair in Wigan to buy a petrol tank for the Lambretta Jet 200 that I was restoring. While I was there I saw a good, straight Spanish Series 3 Li 150 frame for sale for £40 from Buzzsolomoto. I bought it, and brought it home hanging out the boot of my car. I put it in my garage where it remained for the next 12 years. This is it :

One day, about 3 years ago, I decided to finally do something with it. The price of these frames has really gone up and I could have sold this one as it was for around £350. I had an engine and some bodywork, so I bought a pair of remade side panels and a front mudguard to make the scooter complete. The next task was to ‘dry build’ the scooter to make sure that everything fitted and that the panel gaps were all correct. This is essential when building a scooter as you don’t want to start making things fit after it’s been painted. This is the dry build:

 

Once you are satisfied that everything fits o/k, you then strip it all down again for painting. In my case, it was done professionally by a car bodyshop in Speke. While they were doing that, I overhauled the engine. It’s a GP 125 engine with a 175 barrel and piston. It has a 26mm ‘Jetex’ carburettor and a 42mm AF/Rayspeed Clubman exhaust. Once I got the panels back, it was time for the re-assembly without hopefully scratching anything !. Here’s some pictures during the rebuild :

I insured the scooter on the frame number with Carole Nash and had it m.o.t’d by Derry at Franklyn Motors. Derry is a member of the Liverpool Scooter Club and is a staunch supporter of all our functions and events.

I then sent off all the documents to the DVLA to register it – and that’s when disaster struck !. The DVLA told me that the scooter was already registered to a guy in the south of England and that my scooter must be a ‘ringer’. They said that my scooter could be confiscated and possibly even crushed !. My frame number is 100% genuine and has been closely examined by Derry for the m.o.t, Peter Davies from the British Lambretta Archive ( who is also a Police Officer and a vehicle examiner ) and by the Lambretta Club of Great Britain. I also got really great help from the Merseyside Police Stolen Vehicle Unit. The DVLA procrastinated for 6 months before finally admitting that the one down south was the potential ‘ringer’, and that the owner would soon be getting a knock on his door. They then issued the registration number which you now see on the scooter.

Phew! … it all worked out o/k in the end !. Restoring a scooter involves many long nights in the shed, and great expense as well. After doing 2 now, I swore I’d never do another. Hmmm……a Series 2 restoration might just tempt me. Watch this space ! -Geoff.